Tag Archives: Feminism

London-bound

Bonjour amis/amies,

I’m flying to London in a few hours! I’ll be in London this weekend visiting my great London lady-love, Lex, who I met last November in the Collectif boutique near Brick Lane. She’s another fabulous feminist/vintage girl (how do I find these people?), a high femme, and generally extravagant person. We were inseparable for the last days of my trip last year.

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This weekend we’ll be bonding, brunching, and probably staring into each others’ eyes. In adorable news, Lex and her boyfriend Theo are engaged, as of Thursday, so there is that excitement to deal with.

There will be London/Lex blog updates, OBVIOUSLY, but if you stay tuned to @ravishingretro and @theseasonofthewitch on instagram, there will be much to see there, I promise you.

Gros bisous de Lyon,

Michelle

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Seam Magazine

Thank you for your lovely and interesting responses to my post on vintage and feminism – I’m still responding to some of you. Even though I do have a specific blog for all my feminist musings (or as of late, lack thereof), I’d like to make posts like these more of a regular feature on Ravishing, seeing as we’re all so inspired. At the very least, I daresay I’ll put up something about vintage and body image at some point: a topic I decided to save for a separate post as I just have SO MANY FEELINGS about it all.

As I’m still living off my travel wardrobe, I don’t really have any fabulous outfits to showcase from my recent wanderings. Instead, I’ll show you an outfit I wore awhile back to the launch of Seam Magazine in Brisbane.

I should have written about Seam Magazine before now, because it’s all kinds of adorable. The crafty, vintage-inspired zine, written by the lovely Linsey from Brisbane, is an absolute visual feast – the photo shoots, featuring dreamy fashions by Alice Nightingale, are positively to die for. It’s also the perfect accompaniment to a pot of Earl Gray tea and some cookies. Seriously, vintage types – get on that (check it out here or on etsy).

And voila, the outfit:


50s dress: Love Vintage Fair 2011
60s pillbox hat: Paddington, Brisbane
Gloves: Paddington, Brisbane
Belt: Brisbane Antique Centre
50s necklace: Love Vintage Fair 2011
Shoes: Bloch

I leave for Las Vegas very soon, so leave me your travel tips if you have any.

In any case, à bientôt !

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Filed under Outfit Posts, Travel

Vintage and Feminism

I’ve been wanting to put up a post about vintage and feminism for awhile now, so with vintage blogs all abuzz with the topic in right now, I thought it was time I published my thoughts on the subject.

Feminism is one of my great loves (some of you may know that I actually have a somewhat neglected feminist blog called Woolf Woolf: A Blog of One’s Own that I set up towards the end of 2011), so naturally, I was thrilled to see the topic come up in the vintage blogosphere. Gemma of Retro Chick wrote a post on the subject, as did Lena of Style High Club. Both posts are very interesting, and it’s cool to see thoughts pouring in on the subject from all their readers.

(Actually since Lori of Rarely Wears Lipstick added her thoughts, I fear there’s not a lot left to say, but allons-y nonetheless!)

This is what a feminist looks like.

Feminism is an issue that I think vintage wearers must confront from time to time, seeing as our clothes quite obviously reference more repressive or tumultuous times for women. Looking like a museum piece has the side effect of people assuming you have some sort of comment on the era you “come from”, and so it is that we are brought into conversations of this nature.

People often like to draw my attention to the irony of being a feminist dressed like a 1950s housewife. More frequently, I’m misread as conservative, as people mistake my aesthetic nostalgia for a moral nostalgia. Some people have trouble seeing vintage clothes without imagining the vintage world.

The truth is that most of us wear the clothes, but not the attitudes. In fact, although superficially “conservative”, the vintage community seems to have produced an unusually high number of kickass feminists, radicals and unorthodox thinkers.

Independent dressing attracts independent men and women. Vintage-wearers aren’t exactly fashionable in their knee-length skirts and hats, but I think that coming to terms with being unfashionable takes a great deal of strength. Choosing to forego fashion trends may seem trivial, but I see it as a form of resistance.

This phenomenon is paraphrased rather nicely by Gemma of Retrochick:

In my experience it’s those women and girls with the confidence to break away from … cultural norms that are more likely to demonstrate  an independent spirit, and the intelligence to deconstruct what they see presented to them as “ideal”.

I don’t mean to suggest that dressing in vintage frocks is in itself an inherently feminist act, because of course it is the strength of one’s conviction rather than one’s wardrobe that makes a feminist; but I do want to suggest that feminism is particularly relevant to the vintage subculture, and that having the confidence to develop one’s own style in opposition to what is prescribed by the fashion industry and/or the media does indicate some sort of radical thought.

I feel like one radical act breeds another, so once one comes to reject mainstream standards of beauty, one is probably a lot more likely to reject other things too, like patriarchy, for instance – cue feminism.

Of course this isn’t to privilege vintage styles over any other styles. The basic feminist doctrine of choice dictates that one should act on one’s own whims, so a feminist can just as easily be found in a mini-skirt or denim shorts as in a 1940s tea frock or tweed breeches.

Potential Feminist

Also a Potential Feminist

The problem surrounding modern fashions (described by Gemma and Lena as “hypersexualised”) is perhaps the sense of coercion, by which I mean that a lot of women may feel like they don’t have free license to experiment, or deviate from the trends. This isn’t really a problem created by the particular fashions, but more by mainstream media/etc, although I suppose because the styles themselves channel a level of sensuality that may be unnatural or uncomfortable to some girls, the problem is sort of exacerbated.

Vintage has its problems too – the male gaze has always been around, so the clothes don’t really sidestep any accusations of objectification and such. The difference, as I see it, is probably that a higher proportion of those who dress in vintage have made a very conscious choice to do so, and there’s also therefore a higher chance they’re well-equipped to deal with misogyny.

Although wearing vintage is not inherently feminist, I think it can easily, and often does, produce feminists – and I love that. Nevertheless, there are a lot of ways to rebel, and wearing vintage is just one of them. That independent spirit that makes a feminist can manifest itself in endlessly unique and equally valid ways.

Having victory rolls is hardly a prerequisite for feminism, but they can top off the fabulous vintage look of your local kickass feminist who’s putting up her middle finger to patriarchy.

Images via here and here.

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Filed under Feminism, Vintage 101

Entertainment Guaranteed

I’ve finished uni for the year, so naturally I’ve been browsing my google reader with fierce intensity. Here are some things I’ve found pretty and/or interesting.

Ok that’s all. As a bonus photo, here’s a shot from my jaunt to France in June/July that I recently unearthed:


Blouse: The Vintage Nest, Bellingen
Skirt: Gorman
Cardigan: Thrifted
Bag: Thrifted

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